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Author Topic: Help! Halo of paint on a classic g3 glitter/pearlized body  (Read 336 times)

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Offline Cristar

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Help! Halo of paint on a classic g3 glitter/pearlized body
« on: April 09, 2019, 07:26:31 PM »
Hello everyone, I need an advice! I have a G3 Skywishes that has been in contact with a wooden object painted yellow. Now she has little yellow halos on legs (her body is pink).  :sad: What's the solution? Can I do sunfading on a g3 glitter/pearlized body? Thanks to everyone who answers!

EDIT: Here are the photos: (It's quite hard to see, I know. Actually it's more evident)

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« Last Edit: April 10, 2019, 05:28:45 PM by Cristar »

Offline BlushingBlue

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Re: Help! Halo of paint on a classic g3 glitter/pearlized body
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2019, 09:47:23 PM »
Is there any chance you could post a picture so we can see what you're up against?

Just going on what you've said, in this particular instance I would be wary of sunfading. The yellow dye is probably more lightfast than Skywishes' pink body, and there's a good chance of bleaching out some of her natural color before the yellow disappears. It's your call whether or not you want to risk it. Maybe the yellow marks bother you more than Skywishes having a lighter body color.

If you don't want to risk it, and the stain isn't very deep, you might try gently abrading it off with Magic Eraser or very, very fine sandpaper first. If it's deep-set... Maybe you could craft some cute socks or legwarmers to cover the marks? Call it a gift from Minty to a friend in need. ;)

Offline Cristar

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Re: Help! Halo of paint on a classic g3 glitter/pearlized body
« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2019, 05:56:37 PM »
Thanks for your advises, BlushingBlue! (Minty's socks are a solution to all world problems!  :thumb: )
I added photos as you suggested. I tried with hydrogen peroxide on the leg in the first pic. It's a 40 vol. oxidizing emulsion cream for human hair. The stain has not disappeared, but has become a halo, unlike the stain in the second photo. Perhaps it happened because I should have removed the cream before it dried out, so I would have removed the yellow color too. Perhaps, if the cream dries, the color returns in the pony's body? Probably it's a stupid question. Please, don't laugh at me!  :blush:
Moreover, the cream I own is quite old. Perhaps if I use a brand new product like this, I'll get a better result?

Just going on what you've said, in this particular instance I would be wary of sunfading. The yellow dye is probably more lightfast than Skywishes' pink body, and there's a good chance of bleaching out some of her natural color before the yellow disappears. It's your call whether or not you want to risk it. Maybe the yellow marks bother you more than Skywishes having a lighter body color.

I haven't tried sunfading yet. Someone can tell me if sunfading + hydrogen peroxide is a good or a bad idea?
I can wrap the pony in paper towel to avoid problems, leaving only the affected areas exposed.
What do you think?
Thank you anyways!  ^.^

Offline lovesbabysquirmy

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Re: Help! Halo of paint on a classic g3 glitter/pearlized body
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2019, 06:50:19 PM »
Be careful with any kind of bleaching cream. They can continue to leach into the plastic and cause discoloration. There isn't really a way to stop the chemical reaction so using a source of sunlight is a safer alternative to stains.

Wrap the pony up in foil and expose only the stained area, check every few days.
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Offline BlushingBlue

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Re: Help! Halo of paint on a classic g3 glitter/pearlized body
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2019, 01:32:31 AM »
Thanks for putting up the pictures! It's not as bad as I was imagining, but I believe you that it looks worse in person.

I tried with hydrogen peroxide on the leg in the first pic. It's a 40 vol. oxidizing emulsion cream for human hair. The stain has not disappeared, but has become a halo, unlike the stain in the second photo. Perhaps it happened because I should have removed the cream before it dried out, so I would have removed the yellow color too. Perhaps, if the cream dries, the color returns in the pony's body? Probably it's a stupid question. Please, don't laugh at me!  :blush:
Moreover, the cream I own is quite old. Perhaps if I use a brand new product like this, I'll get a better result?

It's not a stupid question, don't worry! Hydrogen peroxide works by breaking down the chemical structure of the dye, so you don't have to worry about it re-coloring the pony even if it dries out. :bigups: 40 volume is quite strong for peroxide, so I'm a little surprised you didn't have more dramatic results. It could very well be that your cream has degraded in strength over time.

UV light acts as a catalyst for hydrogen peroxide, so setting Skywishes in the sun with the cream on would serve to boost the efficiency, but do be careful and check her often, especially if you use fresh peroxide. A little staining is better than bleached-out spots in my opinion! ;) As a rule of thumb in terms of pony bodies, lavenders and blues bleach easiest, then pinks and greens, then orange and yellow. For example, it takes a lot less to bleach Seashell than Bubbles, so it's important to tailor the aggressiveness of your stain-removal techniques.

Also, there are a bunch of technical factors that go into determining how fugitive (fade-able) a stain can be. (Photo- vs chemical oxidation, dyes vs pigments, organic vs inorganic, azo vs carbonyl molecular bonds, etc.) It's a balancing act of a lot of potential variables, so unfortunately there's no single panacea that is best in all situations. Things would be a lot easier if there were! :lol:

Offline Cristar

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Re: Help! Halo of paint on a classic g3 glitter/pearlized body
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2019, 09:10:49 AM »
using a source of sunlight is a safer alternative to stains.
Wrap the pony up in foil and expose only the stained area, check every few days.

Thanks for your advice! I haven't tried sunfading because sometimes this process has tragically yellowed other ponies of my collection!  :yikes: (for example Coconut Grove... Maybe a strange reaction because she's a perfumed pony?)
Of corse I always use foil in order to protect the pony's body. Actually, I read on MLP Preservation Project site that aluminum foil can have a yellowing effect on the vinyl, so I generally wrap the pony in paper towel and then in foil, and expose only the stained area.


Hydrogen peroxide works by breaking down the chemical structure of the dye, so you don't have to worry about it re-coloring the pony even if it dries out. :bigups: 40 volume is quite strong for peroxide, so I'm a little surprised you didn't have more dramatic results. It could very well be that your cream has degraded in strength over time.

UV light acts as a catalyst for hydrogen peroxide, so setting Skywishes in the sun with the cream on would serve to boost the efficiency, but do be careful and check her often, especially if you use fresh peroxide. A little staining is better than bleached-out spots in my opinion! ;) As a rule of thumb in terms of pony bodies, lavenders and blues bleach easiest, then pinks and greens, then orange and yellow. For example, it takes a lot less to bleach Seashell than Bubbles, so it's important to tailor the aggressiveness of your stain-removal techniques.

Also, there are a bunch of technical factors that go into determining how fugitive (fade-able) a stain can be. (Photo- vs chemical oxidation, dyes vs pigments, organic vs inorganic, azo vs carbonyl molecular bonds, etc.) It's a balancing act of a lot of potential variables, so unfortunately there's no single panacea that is best in all situations. Things would be a lot easier if there were! :lol:

Many Thanks for your scientific support BlushingBlue!   :worshippy:

It's true, the result is always different, and depends on the cases. Sometimes sunfading works well, sometime it makes damages. The same applies to hydrogen peroxide.

Well, I'll try with sunfading + hydrogen peroxide, but for a very short time (2 or 3 days)… I will let you know the results!